Sensational Music to Make You Write: Part Three

It’s been incredibly odd not posting the last couple of weeks, and at the same time I feel like I could use a few more, I’m still recovering from my move and settling in to my new place. Whether you may or may not be aware, July happens to be a Camp NaNoWriMo month, practice for the big NaNoWriMo of November. I mention this because of the call for music I’ve seen among a few Twitter people’s I enjoy following, so now seems a great time to share some more music to inspire your writing. So, without further ado:

UCD Choir- Mo Ghille Mer

Songs like this make the Irish part of my heart throb. When I listen to this song, I often get goosebumps as I close my eyes and get lost in the beauty. The scenes that come to mind while listening to it changes, but the strongest involve woods with sunlight streaming through trees, green hills with determined and heartened characters making their way across them; perhaps the search for something lost prompts an unexpected journey.

Erutan- Transylvanian Lullaby

Where to start with my love of Erutan’s work? She’s absolutely sensational, her skill and talent are on display in this beautiful music. Setting aside the amazing fact that she arranged and performed each part of it herself, the music and voice are enchanting. It’s a lullaby for a reason, but that doesn’t mean it’s not ripe with ideas to pluck like the strings of instrument or heart.

Jeff Beal- Next Line (from House of Cards)

Whether you listen to this song without having seen it in context of the show it’s from, or not, there’s no denying the intensity creeping through the music and voice. The way the music grows, the ethereal voice surging through the background, has followed me into my dreams and waking thoughts. There’s triumph as well as suspicion lacing through the notes that seems to put me in mind of capes whipping through the woods, leaving behind or surging towards something.

Zardnonic & Voicians- Bring Back the Glory 

I know, not a typical suggestion, but I have been a fan of this one ever since the first time I had the most vivid daydream to this song. Seriously, it was awesome in the true sense of the word. This song was the soundtrack to an epic battle beginning in free fall from the sky, swords clashing and wind twisted bodies about, dragons soaring in, flips, dives…it was a hell of a spell to find myself unexpectedly under. I wrote at least three different variations of a scene to this song, who knows how many more I’ll manage.

Hans Zimmer- Romani Holiday from Sherlock Holmes

It starts off soft and slow, but it doesn’t take long to pick up the pace and meet the notes that make your spine tingle…or mine anyway. Hans Zimmer is a fantastic composer and there are countless examples to prove it, and this is one. I love putting this on when looking for energy for a scene, perhaps a chase, switch, gambit, or a chaotic moment; my fingers can’t always keep pace.

Poitin- The Congress Wheel

Another song from the Sherlock Holmes, this one has a lot of energy and is sure to fuel your scene with its vivacity. It could easily inspire a jovial tavern scene, a suspenseful chase, a flirtatious allusion, etc. Even just listening to it a couple of times will inspire you to do something, so why not write a few paragraphs?

Misty Mountains Cold- The Hobbit

You don’t have to have read or seen The Hobbit to appreciate the inspiration that can be found in this song. I enjoy the landscapes and culture that come to mind as I listen to the sweet, rumbling voices in this song, even if I ignore the actual lyrics. When writing adventure, a harrowing journey, foreshadowing of trials, yearning, this is a good song to look to for inspiration, in my opinion.

Clocks and Clouds –Darkness Gives Way

I found Clocks and Clouds through Twitter, after they crossed my path by chance. As those who’ve been around a while can attest, I’m an adorer of strings, and this song plucks my heart just right. The shifting of the tempo and music lends itself to a changing scene, infusing you with all of its energy before you let fly on paper or screen.

For whom the bell tolls – Steve Baker & Carmen Daye

Donnie Darko fans may recognize this song, and it’s certainly one you should listen to if you’re looking for something to set the scene and inspire something dark, plaintive, haunting, sorrowful. It makes me think of a gallows on a frozen day, tears becoming icicles on frostbitten cheeks, perhaps a weary procession through a desolate wood. I don’t know many writers that could say they enjoy writing the type of scene invoked by this song, but listening to it could help channel that emotion into your words and your scene.

Vlada Mars- The Storm

When it comes to purely instrumental music, it’s more likely to be more solo strings than piano, just happens to be a personal preference. However, thanks to a suggestion from the witty and wonderful B.E. Van de Viere on Twitter, I gave a listen to some Vlada Mars and found The Storm. This music puts me in mind of grand old houses with something hidden inside, mysteries waiting to be unwrapped like presents, tumultuous situations ready to spiral into chaos.

Between Music- Breaking the Surface

Between Music is a band that plays and performs their music under water…yes, you read that right, under water, and some of the most hauntingly beautiful music you will hear. Putting aside the amazing ingenuity of creating instruments and apparatus to make this possible, I think it’s hard to disagree with the fact that this is some of the best music to inspire water related fantastical beings; mermaids, sirens, nymphs, water gods and goddesses, whatever story you find in the watery depths of the oceans. It’s definitely not for everyone, but something about this holds an ethereal beauty for me.

So concludes Part 3 of music to help get those writing gears going. I hope you’ve enjoyed! Do you have any favorites?

 

You Might Also Like:
Sensational Music to Make You Write: Part One
Sensational Music to Make You Write: Part Two

 

 

 

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